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Community History Program

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Event Dates: November 7, 2013

The last in a five-part series of book discussions covers Fatima Mernissi’s Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood, an extraordinary account of growing up in a domestic harem in 1940s Morocco. The discussion will be led by Kari Neely, Assistant Professor of Arabic & Middle Eastern Studies at MTSU.  The series occurs at the Edmondson Branch Library, Nashville, 6-8pm.

Event Dates: February 24, 2014

The fourth in a five-part series of book discussions will cover novelist Kamila Shamsie's Broken Verses, a mystery set in modern day Pakistan involving poetry, politics and family. The discussion will be led by Douja Mamelouk, Assistant Professor of Arabic & French, University of Tennesse at Knoxville.  The series occurs at the Cedar Bluff Branch Library, Knoxville, 6-8pm.

Event Dates: February 10, 2014

The third in a five-part series of book discussions will cover House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East, by Lebanese-American journalist Anthony Shahid in which he chronicles his return to and restoration of his ancestral home. The discussion will be led by Douja Mamelouk, Assistant Professor of Arabic & French, University of Tennesse at Knoxville.  The series occurs at the Cedar Bluff Branch Library, Knoxville, 6-8pm.

Resources for Hosting Bittersweet Harvest Exhibition

These resources will help you plan and present the Bittersweet Harvest exhibition. 

 

Event Dates: January 13, 2014

The first in a five-part series of book discussions will cover Hishram Matar's In the Country of Men, a novel of a Libyan childhood in 1979. The discussion will be led by Douja Mamelouk, Assistant Professor of Arabic & French, University of Tennesse at Knoxville  The series occurs at the Cedar Bluff Branch Library, Knoxville, 6-8pm.

Join us for the full series.  All books in the series are available through the Knox County Public Library system.

Bittersweet Harvest: The Bracero Program, 1942-1964

Bittersweet Harvest: The Bracero Program, 1942-1964 is a bilingual, traveling poster exhibit exploring the roots of Mexican migrant labor to the United States, and toured across the state from the Fall of 2013 through 2015.

Muslim Journeys: Points of View

Muslim Journeys: Points of View was a five-part book discussion series focused on literature by/about individuals of Muslim-majority nations, and partially supported by a grant from the American Library Association. Our series, which occurred in Nashville in fall of 2013 and Knoxville in winter 2014, included the following books:

Barn Again! Celebrating an American Icon

Barn Again! gave exhibition visitors new ways to consider a familiar icon. Using farm architecture and its adaptations, the exhibition explored agricultural changes and major movements in American history such as 19th century European immigration, westward migration, and the rise of large-scale, industrial farming in the 20th century. Panels, photographs, and artifacts, including an architectural scale model of an English barn, examples of nails, roofing and a mortise and tenon joint illustrate this agricultural history.

Produce for Victory: Posters on the American Home Front, 1941-1945

Using the popular appeal of Madison Avenue advertising and the Hollywood look, World War II posters urged every American on the home front to be a production soldier in the effort to win World War II. They encouraged citizens to boost production in the factories and to save and sacrifice in the home. The populace received a daily dose of propaganda through the bold graphics of the posters that hung on factory walls, offices, and grocery store windows throughout the country.

Key Ingredients: Tennessee by Food

Key Ingredients: America by Food is a provocative and thoughtful look at the historical, regional, and social traditions that merge in everyday meals and celebrations. Through a selection of artifacts, photographs, and illustrations, Key Ingredients provides a lively cultural history in which food and food traditions are used to explore cultural settlement and expansion, regional identity, immigration, social change, and community life.

Past Projects

Decades of work bringing humanities programming to Tennesseans across the state lead to a varied collection of past projects we've undertaken and rich content associated with them. Here is a glimpse of some of our past projects, for your perusal. 

Robert Penn Warren Center partners with Humanities Tennessee

Humanities Tennessee and the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities at Vanderbilt have a long history of successful collaborations. We have done a number of programs together over the years, including a series of public lectures, coordinating meetings of public humanities personnel in the region, and programming around joint invitations to various chairs of the National Endowment for the Humanities to visit our region.  

Event Dates: April 4, 2013

Part five of the series, War and Freedom, will occur Thursday, April 4th, 6:00pm, at the Morristown Hamblen Public Library, and is facilitated by Dr. Nancy Schurr.  Part five focuses on emancipation and the experience of African Americans at the war's end, featuring excerpts from Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Walker, Leon Litwack and more.

Event Dates: March 28, 2013

Part five of the series, War and Freedom, will occur Thursday, March 28th, 6:00pm, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Public Library in Memphis, and is facilitated by Dr. Tim Huebner.  Part five focuses on emancipation and the experience of African Americans at the war's end, featuring excerpts from Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Walker, Leon Litwack and more.

Event Dates: March 19, 2013

Part five of the series, War and Freedom, will occur Tuesday, March 19th, 6:00pm, at the Clarksville-Montgomery County Library, and is facilitated by Dr. Richard Gildrie.  Part five focuses on emancipation and the experience of African Americans at the war's end, featuring excerpts from Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Walker, Leon Litwack and more.